Dupont 2021 Art Exhibition. A Wonderful Success!

The Dupont Art Club has just completed a successful Annual Art Exhibition. Our Chair could not have put it more succinctly in his following recap.

“We were a little concerned about our Art Show, as we were holding it in October not August and were still in the Covid Pandemic. But, as we had 110 pictures on show and 440 visitors, it was a wonderful success, so we need not have worried!
I was extremely pleased of the high standard of the art work, a number of visitors remarked on what a great selection of quality artwork we were showing.

The Dupont shop looked stunning and made sales of over £450, our thanks go to Tina Stiles O’Brien and Judy Alexander who organised the shop.

Our special thanks go to Judy, not only for manning the shop over the three days, but also for providing her credit card reader which enabled us to sell pictures and gifts paid for on line.

We sold 13 pictures, one visitor bought 3! And because of their high standard of work, Victor Perkins and Carol Cleveland both received a commission for a new painting.

So thank you all those that took part and helped with manning the show, in particular the new members who joined us recently.

Once again the competition to select the Dupont artist of the year was the highlight.
Zoella Reardon was the runner up with her painting “Autumn”. Congratulations Zoella. I hope you enjoy the wine.

The Dupont artist of the year and the winner of the Dupont cup was Victor Perkins with his drawing “Leena”. Congratulations Victor.

“Leena” by Victor Perkins

He was presented with a bottle of champagne and a certificate to record his win.

 

Numbers at sessions are increasing every week with many new members; they are very welcome and hopefully will be able to take part in next year’s Art Show.”

John Hird.
Chair

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THE DUPONT ART EXHIBITION IS OPEN!

The Dupont Art Club starts the annual Dupont Art Exhibition on October 21 to 23rd from 10 to 5 daily. The art is amazing and the art shop has such a great selection of crafts, jewellery, cards, pottery, textiles and more. Check out some recent publications from our members who have had a number of great books printed.
There will be plenty of photos for you to view tomorrow so come and see us personally or check out what you might be missing here on our website.

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Dupont Art Club Exhibition Results

Thank you to the hundreds of viewers who cast votes for their favourite painting in this year’s Annual Art Exhibition which took place on line. We are proud to announce the winner and runners up.

Winner: Natasha Owen for Foamy, with her mixed media. painting. Natasha wins a bottle of champagne and the Dupont cup for a year.

The Runner Up is Victor Perkins for Beckets’s Mate, with his acrylic painting. Victor wins a bottle of wine and a certificate

 

The second Runner-up is Wendy Webb for Teddy, with her pastel painting. Wendy wins a bottle of wine and a certificate.

Congratulations to all prize winners. The competition and exhibition have been a resounding success. We thank everyone who took part, entering their work or voting.

All the pictures will now be transferred to the Gallery Page of the website. Anyone who would like to purchase a piece of art can send an email to dupontartclub@gmail.com with their contact details and they will be put in contact with the artist.

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Charcoal drawing by Caroline Marsden 11/03/20

Charcoal as a medium lends itself particularly well to moody urban landscapes.

Caroline decided to draw this snowy street scene

Using Windsor and Newton charcoal, which is a good quality with velvety texture, Caroline began by blocking in the shapes of the buildings. She then lightly rubbed over the charcoal to smooth it.

She applied the charcoal  across the road and then used a rubber to erase the tyre marks and show the snow.

She went over the buildings to outline the edges and put in marks for the windows and the arches. It is important to keep your marks consistent as this will make the drawing harmonious.

She determined that the vanishing point was at the meeting of the two sides of the road in the far distance. She then drew light diagonal lines out  from the vanishing point to the edges of the paper to get the perspective right.

The focal point of the drawing is the lamppost as it is the area of greatest contrast as it stands out against the bright sky.

Caroline went on to use a thinner piece of charcoal for the details. She put in the snow on the bicycle , and on the signs by using the rubber. Remember it’s easy to rub out and redraw any areas you’re unhappy with until you get the desired result.

 

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Still Life by Caroline Marsden

Start out by choosing your main object, then you can add interest by selecting additional objects which compliment this. It’s probably best to have a theme, which can be anything  – the possibilities are endless.

You should use an odd number of objects as this is more appealing than an even number. Make sure you have variety in size and shape as well as colour. When arranging the objects try to ensure that you use the shapes to lead the eye into and around the image.

A square format works well for still life, but depending on your subjects you can also use portrait or landscape.

Good lighting is essential and it may help to position an Anglepoise lamp to get good shadows which create tonal value.

This is the still life Caroline prepared

She started by lightly drawing the main object  in outline which was the large bottle, which she positioned slightly right of centre. Next she drew the small bottle outline, noting its size and shape relative to the first object. Continuing, she added the onion the orange and the bottle top, carefully checking where objects overlapped. The scissors were then drawn in very carefully, as the long point of the blade is used to lead the eye . When trying to place an object at an angle like this, it may help to hold your pencil horizontally  up towards the object and tilt it to the required angle. Then place the pencil at this angle on the paper. Don’t use an eraser if you are unhappy with the positioning, just redraw in the correct position next to it. The danger of using an eraser is that it is easy to redraw the same mistake once you’ve removed the original.

Once all your outlines are in you can go back and enter the details . Finally you put in the shadows. These are very important to add tonal value . The dark line on the scissors leads the eye up to the dark top of the onion and from there up to the hanging leaf. This will create harmony.

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Painting or drawing upside down by Caroline Marsden

It is a good idea to try this as an exercise to change the way that you look at things. By working upside down you draw only the shapes you can see and not what you think should be there.

Caroline started by using this photograph pinned upside down

You can, if you prefer, simplify things by splitting the photograph into four  to help you in positioning.

Using a 7B pencil she first drew an ellipse ( representing the tabletop ). Using this shape to work from, she went on to put in the oblong shape underneath and the black square to the left of that. From there she entered the curves which take the eye down from both the square and the oblong to the bottom. She continued in this way, plotting in the main larger shapes.

After all the main shapes were done she moved on to the more intricate parts. This is done by paying close attention to where things are positioned relative to the other main shapes already done. This really will hone your observational skills.

Finally think about adding tonal value. Caroline used  an 8B pencil to shade in the darkest areas first then the lighter areas using a variety of hatching and crosshatching.

Only when she had finished did she turn the drawing the right way up.

this was a very good representation of the original photograph

 

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A winter scene in watercolour using only Sienna and Ultra Marine 11/12/19

Caroline chose the two colours of sienna and ultramarine blue as they can be mixed in many different ways to give you both cool and warm colours.

The group selected this photo for Caroline to use as her inspiration.

 

When starting a watercolour it is best to work from light to dark. Looking  at the picture, first determine where your lightest areas are.

Caroline was using White Knight watercolours and a large round  brush with a good point to it. She began using a dilute sienna for the sky and the reflection, and let this dry. She then mixed two shades of grey using both colours . She began to put in the tree line using the lighter colour. She used the brush in small  upward strokes moving along the tree line. Then she drew up the water in a horizontal stroke to avoid a harsh line. She went on to add a darker line underneath for more tonal contrast. You may need to revisit the darker area as it will dry lighter.

Once happy with the top part she went on to do the reflections carefully putting them in the correct position .Using a dry brush she put in some texture.

She put in the darker trees using a rigger for the trunks and finally the darkest trees .

She decided that the little island in the foreground would be the focal point, so she painted this in a warm tone using only sienna at first. She added some more sienna to the parts of the painting for cohesion.

She put in the ray of light by swiping a tissue in a diagonal line which was very effective.

Finally she put in a ghost wash to of ultra marine to add mood to the background.

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Painting a Christmas Card 27/11/19

Caroline suggested that to get inspiration for your card it is a good idea to have a look at cards from earlier years. Christmas cards have evolved in their design from the Victorian age to the present day.

We looked at several different cards from the Art Deco to the war years , here are a few examples:-

Caroline decided on a stylised angel for today’s demo.

She started by drawing out the shape to fill the card using the angel wings to stretch up into the corners.

She then chose a focal point which in this case would be a light being carried by the angel. Next she angled the lines of the wings so that they drew the eye to the focal point. You can find many different styles of angel on the internet on which to base your own creation.

Once happy with your outline you must choose your colours so that the angel comes forward in the painting.

Caroline started with a turquoise wash on the angel’s robe and then used a cobalt blue for the background. She mixed a warm red to add interest to the robe. The light is then added using a bright yellow and this colour is also added to the angel’s halo and as reflected light on her wings.

This was just a quick sketch from which she would go on to produce the finished card.

If you would prefer to make a humorous card , again there are many examples on the internet. Last year Caroline made a card for her friend who had a cat called Jack.  She drew Jack as a Christmas tree with his little paws holding candles and a fish shaped Christmas present under the tree.

 

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USING OIL PASTELS 16/10/19

Caroline introduced a session on oil pastels by saying that it is wise to use the best quality pastels. The ones she had were Sennelier (£3.50 a stick, or can be bought in boxes). For paper, a rough surface is needed and she was using a brown paper scrapbook (Seawhites).Caroline had a photo portrait of a long haired Roma male as her model for today’s demonstration.

Beginning with a dark brown outline, Caroline sketched his features with the edge of the pastel. She blocked shadows with dark brown, followed by red and green reflected on one side of the face by the grassy background. The green was toned down by use of yellow ochre on top. Various colours were applied and built up either by layers of pastel or by blending with fingers. A useful tool was a paper pencil-shaped blender, which could be dipped onto the pastel to pick out small delicate areas. This method was useful for sections of the eye, such as upper and lower lids, and for the light reflected in the iris.

 

 

 

 

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PAINTING ROTHKO AND COLOUR THEORY 2/10/2019

Mark Rothko. B 1903 D. 1970

Markus Rothkovitz was a Latvian of Jewish descent. His family emigrated from persecution and settled in Oregon in 1913, where he started painting. In 1920 he moved to the New York Art School where he became anti-establishment and was influenced by Klee, Cezanne and Picasso.
Rothko taught children for 20 years. He liked the simplicity of children’s art. In the 1950s his art became completely abstract, using blocks of colour and influenced by the Fauvists. In the 1960s he used blocks of intense colour, following which he suffered from depression, reflected in his use of darker colours with less luminosity.

Demonstration
Caroline chose a thick first coat of yellow, then mixed Phalo green and purple as a compliment to the colour wheel.

Then mixed an intense orange and placed it into the yellow square.

There then followed a succession of different choices of colour to illustrate the effect of one colour on another.

 

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