Dupont to Temporarily Close

We have been reading the Government instructions and recommendation regarding Covid-19 and the actions organizations should take. Having listened also to comments from members, we have decided the time has come to close the club with immediate effect.

We do this reluctantly as we know many members see their time at Dupont as an important part of their week.

Not knowing how long the situation will last, and because we want to stay in touch with our members, we are looking at setting up “Dupont Art On-line” using our website. Our tutors are working on programmes and demonstrations which will be available to members, providing an ongoing link with Dupont. As soon as we have more information we will be in touch.

In the meantime, check out our posts
below from Carolyn’s demos and have a little practice with them.

Thank you for your support, please stay safe during this very difficult time.

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Charcoal drawing by Caroline Marsden 11/03/20

Charcoal as a medium lends itself particularly well to moody urban landscapes.

Caroline decided to draw this snowy street scene

Using Windsor and Newton charcoal, which is a good quality with velvety texture, Caroline began by blocking in the shapes of the buildings. She then lightly rubbed over the charcoal to smooth it.

She applied the charcoal  across the road and then used a rubber to erase the tyre marks and show the snow.

She went over the buildings to outline the edges and put in marks for the windows and the arches. It is important to keep your marks consistent as this will make the drawing harmonious.

She determined that the vanishing point was at the meeting of the two sides of the road in the far distance. She then drew light diagonal lines out  from the vanishing point to the edges of the paper to get the perspective right.

The focal point of the drawing is the lamppost as it is the area of greatest contrast as it stands out against the bright sky.

Caroline went on to use a thinner piece of charcoal for the details. She put in the snow on the bicycle , and on the signs by using the rubber. Remember it’s easy to rub out and redraw any areas you’re unhappy with until you get the desired result.

 

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Importance of negative spaces by Keith Manning Kennedy

Keith started by mapping out the outlines of fuchsias  in a vase using a 4H pencil. To create more interest in shapes and colour he added in two butterflies. He then carefully painted in the background by filling in the negative spaces between the flowers and leaves. Remember that the shapes created  by the negative spaces are themselves a very important element in your mosaic of colour.

As he was painting a brightly coloured piece, he made sure to keep the background a subtle complementary colour. In this case, a pale blue to bring out the magenta in the flower. Old Holland permanent rose and permanent magenta were used for the fuchsia. Always use a freshly  mixed paint and don’t be tempted to use some old ready mixed paint  from your palette which may have become tainted. He used a green gold colour for the leaves. Using a filbert you can get a nice fine line when needed and also get enough paint on the brush to fill in the spaces; a sable brush is well worth the money.

For the more intricate little areas he used a small flat brush and if needed turned the painting upside down to let the water move around within the correct area. If you do get a small puddle forming, dry off your brush and use the brush to soak up the excess.

In watercolour the general rule is that you can apply up to three layers of colour after which the colour goes dead. If this happens you can always get yourself out of trouble by going over it with a lighter shade of pastel or pastel pencil as used in this example.

Failing this you can paint over with a thick  layer of white gouache then wait for this to dry fully before going over with a quick sweep of another colour.

When painting the butterfly’s wing Keith used a graphite pencil to put in the delicate edge and then blended this into the colour.

 

Here are another two examples of Keith’s use of negative space:

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A successful BHAC Exhibition

A very successful  Brighton and Hove Arts Council Annual Art Exhibition  took place April 10th  -13th. Trustee,  John Hird was quoted as follows;

“Many thanks for your support last week at what turned out to be our best art show.
 
    I have been involved for the last eight years and this year was the most successful.
 
    We had 135 pieces of art work, paintings, embroidery,sculpture,drawings and calligraphy.
 
    We sold 15 works of art and had 1022 visitors, the largest number we have experienced.
 
    Congratulations go to Victor Perkins of Dupont Art Club who won the Peoples Choice Cup for his oil painting  ” Grace “
 
   The runner up was Vanessa Reynolds of Adur Art Collective.
 
   Please pass on our thanks to all the members of your club who took part, I am already looking forward to next year.
 
John Hird
    Trustee
   Brighton & Hove Arts Council
www.bh-arts.org.uk
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Pen and Wash demonstration by Caroline Marsland 3rd April 2019

When selecting a paper for pen and wash, a smooth hot pressed watercolour paper is best, as rough watercolour paper catches on the pen.

Caroline chose to work with India ink, you can also use Quink.  She doesn’t recommend hobby craft ink, as it can wash off when your wash is applied, whereas the India ink is permanent.

She prefers to work with a mapping nib rather then a drawing nib, which can be a bit scratchy. The joy of using a dip pen is in the good expression you can get from the different thicknesses of strokes.

First, think about what part of your painting is going to be pen and what part wash. You may want it mainly one or the other.

This is the photograph Caroline was working from ( it’s the steps up to Whitby Abbey)

Caroline chose to start with  the pen, as this gives the most freedom of expression. You should look for where the light is coming from and then make your lighter strokes on the side that is getting the light.

She started with the lamppost as this was central and then worked out from that. Remember it doesn’t have to be perfectly drawn; it is your impression of the scene.  If you prefer, you can draw it out lightly in pencil first.  Dip pens are good for squiggles and shapes to suggest bushes. You shouldn’t try to put in every line. A few details are all that’s needed and the viewer fills in the rest.  If you have an accident and get a splurge on the page, this can be covered using white gouache.

The distant subjects should be drawn lighter with the heaviest lines saved for the foreground. Caroline used a rigger for the railings to make them stand out. Random lines are always more interesting to look at than rigid straight lines.

Check that your ink is dry before starting on the washes. Bear in mind that warm colours make a subject come forward, while cool colours will make it recede. Put in your colours  paying attention to the shadows, and not being too exact with the paint, it’s ok if it bleeds a little. You don’t want it to look like painting by numbers!

Caroline used ultra marine and sienna to get the lovely dark shade for the windows. The more distant the lighter your  paint should be , so the stairs are paler at the most distant part which helps with the perspective.

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Brighton & Hove Arts Council Annual Exhibition

The Brighton and Hove Arts Council’s Annual Art Exhibition

Friends Meeting House
Ship Street, Brighton, BN1 1AF
10 – 13 April 2019
Wednesday – Friday • 10am – 5pm Saturday • 10am – 4pm
• Over 100 works of art by local artists • Vote for the Picture of the Year
• All art work available for sale
Participating groups include:
ADUR ART COLLECTIVE • ATTIC ART CLUB • DUPONT ART CLUB • EMBROIDERERS GUILD (BRIGHTON BRANCH) • ROTTINGDEAN ART CLUB • SEAFORD ART CLUB • SOCIETY OF CATHOLIC ARTISTS (SUSSEX REGIONAL GROUP) • SOCIETY OF SUSSEX PAINTERS, SCULPTORS AND PRINTMAKERS • ST THOMAS MORE ART GROUP
Show sponsors:
Brighton & Hove Arts Council
Registered charity No. 270293
www.bh-arts.org.uk
@BHArtsCouncil @BH_arts_council

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OIL PASTELS DEMO by Caroline Marsland

Caroline brought  oil pastels by Sennelier, which are an excellent choice as they are pigment rich and a delight to work with. Cheaper brands such as W. H. Smith are not so good as they are all wax and hardly any pigment.

Sugar paper is a good alternative to the preferred pastel paper and is cheaper. The most important thing is to use a paper with a good tooth to hold the pastel.

Selecting a colour that is closest to the mug to be painted, Caroline started by drawing a central vertical line to aid in the drawing of the mug. She then used good observation, not forgetting negative spaces, to make an outline of the mug. She squinted to see the reflected colours in the mug and then blocked these in. You can mix the colours on the paper, and then these can be deepened or lightened by layering until the desired hue is achieved. You may like to use your fingers to blend.

Caroline then worked the bottom half of the mug, building up layers . She made the inside of mug totally black as it appeared and then using the edge of the white pastel she put in the highlights round the rim and on the handle. She also used a torchon to make additional highlights and other small marks of colour. You can take off marks made with oil pastel using this tool, unlike chalk pastels (unless you scrape them off!). Using this tool she pulled out nice shapes in the reflected colours .

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Charcoal portraits

The best charcoal to use is Windsor and Newton as it has good deep coverage and is just lovely to use.

Always break the stick into a smaller piece and then you can use it side on or using a corner.

You should use a rough paper with a tooth to give the charcoal something to catch on. Pastel paper is ideal for this.

When tackling a charcoal portrait, you should first decide which method you want to use. Caroline demonstrated both using shadows to define your shapes, and later drafting out your image using the charcoal a bit like a pencil.

She started by covering the entire paper with charcoal lightly, then she put in all the large shadow areas like the eye sockets and under the nose and the outline of the head.

Next she used a rubber  to erase all the lighter areas of the face and eyes and put in all the highlights. She frequently rubbed it on a piece of sand paper to clean the rubber. She used careful observation to ensure that the facial features were correctly sized and positioned, taking note of measurements of spaces between nose and mouth, eyes and nose etc. It’s just a matter of making continual adjustments until you are happy with the end result . Remember you can rub out and replace the charcoal as often as needed. You may prefer to use a charcoal pencil for the finer details, Caroline herself just used the corner of the stick of charcoal. You can also use your fingers to blend it.

The little girl was done using the drawing technique with the corner of the charcoal and then blending with the fingers.

 

 

 

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