Building an Acrylic Painting with Layered Washes

 

Guest instructor, Zara, introduced her favourite method of developing an acrylic painting by using many washes to slowly develop the picture. She said that this meditative process left a painting which was both translucent and in a illustrative painterly way. 

She used two subjects to paint at the same time  so one could dry while the other was being repainted. Before starting, she mixed a small amount of acrylic paint colour in a little water. She had several pots of these mixed colours which she cautioned us to mix well to get rid of the lumps. They had the consistency of creamy milk.. These little containers of watery colours were her paint pallet.

 She then drew the object (apples) and sky landscape first with a light coloured watercolour pencil. She then used a flat brush to paint in the apples and sky with a light colour and let dry. She began to layer the colours to develop each of  the pictures. She followed the shape of the apple with her brush strokes. She warned us that this type of painting could require 20 or more layers so would require patience. She only had time to paint about 3 layers with each picture and said that they would require at least another dozen layers each. 

We began to see the potential after only three layers with some lovely luminous colours being produced. Many of the members used the rest of the afternoon practising this intriguing method of painting with acrylics.

 

 

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Painting with Charcoal and Watercolour

On November 14th instructor Caroline Marsland did a demo on painting using charcoal and watercolour. This was done on 140 pound watercolour paper. This medium is good for moody pictures. There is usually a tinge of charcoal in the watercolour leaving a shaded picture. She used a piece of charcoal but using a charcoal pencil is fine.

Caroline started off with a drawing of the shadows in dark charcoal. She used a loose dribble runny wash for the sky. In order for this not to run into the foreground, she turned the painting upside down to prevent this while painting. Once it is dry, she overpainted it to give it a darker, more dramatic look. The foreground was painted with watercolour which blended into the black charcoal shadows.

The overall effect was a quick moody picture of moody stones.

 

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Dupont Art Annual Exhibition

This year was a successful year for the Dupont Art Club’s annual art exhibition. 

We saw close to 500 people attend with over £1000.00 in sales. We were pleased with these numbers considering the poor weather for half of the days. This year we set up a separate area for our gifts and cards which proved very popular and successful with sales better then ever. 

There were many people voicing an interest in joining this September which would be lovely. We also had a delightful lady sit down at the piano and give a impromptu recital. We captured her pictured with John Hird enjoying the music.

The  peoples choice award was won by Pam Monk. This beautiful oil painting was called ‘the Sting’. The runner up was Carol Cleveland with her painting of Prince. 

All in all, it was a successful exhibition with many people commenting on how professional the paintings were painted and exhibited. 

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Painting a glass bottle 7th December

In this very interesting demonstration, Caroline started with a pale green wash, onto which she loosely sketched the shape of the straight sided bottle. Then she put in a white background around the shape.

Using a flat brush she painted in the four corners and the base of the bottle, then the round neck. A lighter tone of the green base colour filled in the body.

Caroline said that the complex and numerous shapes and reflections could not all be recorded, so we should select some shapes that appealed. A green bag and red bauble that were behind the bottle were incorporated.

Keep the highlights until last and use a rigger and white paint. When painting round bottles, make sure the ellipses match. Caroline finished with some shadows thrown around the base of the bottle.

bottle-1 bottle-2

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