Dupont to Temporarily Close and go ONLINE!

We have been reading the Government instructions and recommendation regarding Covid-19 and the actions organizations should take. Having listened also to comments from members, we have decided the time has come to close the club with immediate effect.

We do this reluctantly as we know many members see their time at Dupont as an important part of their week.

Not knowing how long the situation will last, and because we want to stay in touch with our members, we are looking at setting up “Dupont Art On-line” using our website. Our tutors are working on programmes and demonstrations which will be available to members, providing an ongoing link with Dupont. As soon as we have more information we will be in touch.

In the meantime, check out our posts
below from Carolyn’s demos and have a little practice with them.

Thank you for your support, please stay safe during this very difficult time.

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Charcoal drawing by Caroline Marsden 11/03/20

Charcoal as a medium lends itself particularly well to moody urban landscapes.

Caroline decided to draw this snowy street scene

Using Windsor and Newton charcoal, which is a good quality with velvety texture, Caroline began by blocking in the shapes of the buildings. She then lightly rubbed over the charcoal to smooth it.

She applied the charcoal  across the road and then used a rubber to erase the tyre marks and show the snow.

She went over the buildings to outline the edges and put in marks for the windows and the arches. It is important to keep your marks consistent as this will make the drawing harmonious.

She determined that the vanishing point was at the meeting of the two sides of the road in the far distance. She then drew light diagonal lines out  from the vanishing point to the edges of the paper to get the perspective right.

The focal point of the drawing is the lamppost as it is the area of greatest contrast as it stands out against the bright sky.

Caroline went on to use a thinner piece of charcoal for the details. She put in the snow on the bicycle , and on the signs by using the rubber. Remember it’s easy to rub out and redraw any areas you’re unhappy with until you get the desired result.

 

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A winter scene in watercolour using only Sienna and Ultra Marine 11/12/19

Caroline chose the two colours of sienna and ultramarine blue as they can be mixed in many different ways to give you both cool and warm colours.

The group selected this photo for Caroline to use as her inspiration.

 

When starting a watercolour it is best to work from light to dark. Looking  at the picture, first determine where your lightest areas are.

Caroline was using White Knight watercolours and a large round  brush with a good point to it. She began using a dilute sienna for the sky and the reflection, and let this dry. She then mixed two shades of grey using both colours . She began to put in the tree line using the lighter colour. She used the brush in small  upward strokes moving along the tree line. Then she drew up the water in a horizontal stroke to avoid a harsh line. She went on to add a darker line underneath for more tonal contrast. You may need to revisit the darker area as it will dry lighter.

Once happy with the top part she went on to do the reflections carefully putting them in the correct position .Using a dry brush she put in some texture.

She put in the darker trees using a rigger for the trunks and finally the darkest trees .

She decided that the little island in the foreground would be the focal point, so she painted this in a warm tone using only sienna at first. She added some more sienna to the parts of the painting for cohesion.

She put in the ray of light by swiping a tissue in a diagonal line which was very effective.

Finally she put in a ghost wash to of ultra marine to add mood to the background.

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USING OIL PASTELS 16/10/19

Caroline introduced a session on oil pastels by saying that it is wise to use the best quality pastels. The ones she had were Sennelier (£3.50 a stick, or can be bought in boxes). For paper, a rough surface is needed and she was using a brown paper scrapbook (Seawhites).Caroline had a photo portrait of a long haired Roma male as her model for today’s demonstration.

Beginning with a dark brown outline, Caroline sketched his features with the edge of the pastel. She blocked shadows with dark brown, followed by red and green reflected on one side of the face by the grassy background. The green was toned down by use of yellow ochre on top. Various colours were applied and built up either by layers of pastel or by blending with fingers. A useful tool was a paper pencil-shaped blender, which could be dipped onto the pastel to pick out small delicate areas. This method was useful for sections of the eye, such as upper and lower lids, and for the light reflected in the iris.

 

 

 

 

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PAINTING ROTHKO AND COLOUR THEORY 2/10/2019

Mark Rothko. B 1903 D. 1970

Markus Rothkovitz was a Latvian of Jewish descent. His family emigrated from persecution and settled in Oregon in 1913, where he started painting. In 1920 he moved to the New York Art School where he became anti-establishment and was influenced by Klee, Cezanne and Picasso.
Rothko taught children for 20 years. He liked the simplicity of children’s art. In the 1950s his art became completely abstract, using blocks of colour and influenced by the Fauvists. In the 1960s he used blocks of intense colour, following which he suffered from depression, reflected in his use of darker colours with less luminosity.

Demonstration
Caroline chose a thick first coat of yellow, then mixed Phalo green and purple as a compliment to the colour wheel.

Then mixed an intense orange and placed it into the yellow square.

There then followed a succession of different choices of colour to illustrate the effect of one colour on another.

 

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Building an Acrylic Painting with Layered Washes

 

Guest instructor, Zara, introduced her favourite method of developing an acrylic painting by using many washes to slowly develop the picture. She said that this meditative process left a painting which was both translucent and in a illustrative painterly way. 

She used two subjects to paint at the same time  so one could dry while the other was being repainted. Before starting, she mixed a small amount of acrylic paint colour in a little water. She had several pots of these mixed colours which she cautioned us to mix well to get rid of the lumps. They had the consistency of creamy milk.. These little containers of watery colours were her paint pallet.

 She then drew the object (apples) and sky landscape first with a light coloured watercolour pencil. She then used a flat brush to paint in the apples and sky with a light colour and let dry. She began to layer the colours to develop each of  the pictures. She followed the shape of the apple with her brush strokes. She warned us that this type of painting could require 20 or more layers so would require patience. She only had time to paint about 3 layers with each picture and said that they would require at least another dozen layers each. 

We began to see the potential after only three layers with some lovely luminous colours being produced. Many of the members used the rest of the afternoon practising this intriguing method of painting with acrylics.

 

 

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The use of a flat brush

Brushes come in various shapes including round, filbert (a semi round top and great for portraiture), fan, angular, and the flat brush. Each has it’s own uses.

Caroline Marsland demonstrated the use of the flat brush at class. These brushes  come in all sizes. She chose a medium and medium small to show how one could complete a landscape painting using this one shaped brush. A flat brush can make thick consistent strokes or when it is turned on it’s side, will give you fine lines. It is great for blocking in solid shapes of color such as in the painting of the building shown in her demo. She also showed it’s use in blocking in color for trees.

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Painting in the style of Monet

Caroline Marsland lead us in a demo of a Monet painting. She pointed out the Impressionists of whom he was most famous, were into seeing colours in their environment. `Monet painted with thick oil paint later stumbling with thick paint when his eyesite become poor. He used small strokes that blend often giving a feeling of a haze. His strokes for the sky were often verticle and the water horizontal. He often used a ground color of blue or cream. He painted at the lighter end of the light-dark scale.

`his brief biography is as follows:

Claude Monet, in full Oscar-Claude Monet, (born November 14, 1840, Paris, France—died December 5, 1926, Giverny), French painter who was the initiator, leader, and unswerving advocate of the Impressionist style. In his mature works, Monet developed his method of producing repeated studies of the same motif in series, changing canvases with the light or as his interest shifted. These series were frequently exhibited in groups—for example, his images of haystacks (1890/91) and the Rouen cathedral (1894). At his home in Giverny, Monet created the water-lily pond that served as inspiration for his last series of paintings. His popularity soared in the second half of the 20th century, when his works traveled the world in museum exhibitions that attracted record-breaking crowds and marketed popular commercial items featuring imagery from his art.

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The Zorn Pallet

On April 24th instructor Lucy Parker gave a brief talk to the Wednesday Dupont class  on the zorn pallet used by many artists She described the colours used as yellow ocher, cad red medium. black and white. She said that in using oils, the dark colors should be laid down first. This was a brief outline of her colour mix. 

 

It is described as follows on line:

“The Zorn palette refers to a palette of colors attributed to the great Swedish artist, Anders Zorn (18 February 1860 – 22 August 1920). It consists of just 4 colors being yellow ochre, ivory black, vermilion and titanium white. Cadmium red light is commonly used in place of vermilion by modern day artists.

Whilst this may seem like an extremely limited range of colors, Zorn demonstrated through his paintings just what is possible with such a limited palette. Here are some of his paintings which appear to utilize the Zorn palette:”

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