Brian Blessed and a Dupont Painting

One of Dupont Art Club’s  most successful painters, Pam Monk,  painted a dramatic picture of Brian Blessed in one of his famous roles as King Lear. Pam had said that she would be happy to give the painting to Brian. Dupont member Carol Cleveland who is also an actress contacted Brain who was thrilled to receive the painting. We are thrilled to have photos of the exchange. 

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Painting the Big Picture

Every year Dupont members get together to paint one of the famous masters in huge formate under the guidance of instructor Lucy Parker. Each picture presents us with a challenge. Lucy  enlarges the picture and makes a colour photocopy, this is then cut into 24 pieces and given to members to paint. Members have to work together to ensure the colours match. At the end of the day the picture is assembled and compared to the original.

On June 7th this year Lucy chose the work of Georges Seurat, ‘A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte’. Much fun was had by all who joined in with this pointillism challenge.

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Monoprinting 24th January

Acrylics and oil sticks, along with materials easily assembled at home, monoprinting was the focus of today’s demonstration.

Using an oil stick and a glass sheet (ex-refrigerator), Caroline covered the glass with a layer of oil colour, then laid the paper on top, and used a pencil to draw the desired image, The first impression was quite faint, but further pressing with various implements brought out a stronger image.

      

Judy then produced her gel pad (must be placed on a plastic sheet to avoid absorption on surfaces).

Here acrylic paints were used and slathered onto the pad using a brayer roller to get an even spread. Paper was applied, and a dotted roller to give texture to the print. Judy noted that any image can be cut out and used as a mask at any point in the process.

   

The third part of this very engaging session began with Caroline putting the glass panel on to a grid-marked sheet, which had the “impression” sheet taped, to facilitate a multi-colour print process.

Caroline then painted a yellow pattern of circles on the glass, printed, then red circles.

    

Finally painting black around the patterns before removing the circles before printing the black , which produced the very attractive image below.

   

The final demo involved painting a sky and water scene, cutting a circle of paper (moon!) and inserting it in the image. Paint was wiped away from the path of moonlight and the paper pressed onto the plate, producing the most effective image below.

 

Equipment list:

Rubber roller

Glass plate (or card covered in Cling Film) or a gel pad

Acrylic paint or ink

Paper, Scissors etc.

Et voila…..with thanks to Caroline and Judy, you are a printer!

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The Big Picture

This year the BIG PICTURE chosen by Lucy Parker, our instructor, was WORK by Ford Madox Brown 1852- 1863. Many members of the Dupont Art Club met on May 25th, 2017 to choose and paint a square of this complex piece. It was a fun day and learning experience as Ford was a very skilled  artist and draftsman which we tried to emulate. Wickopedia gives an excellent description of this famous work.

“Work (1852–1865) is a painting by Ford Madox Brown that is generally considered to be his most important achievement. It exists in two versions. The painting attempts to portray, both literally and analytically, the totality of the Victorian social system and the transition from a rural to an urban economy. Brown began the painting in 1852 and completed it in 1865, when he set up a special exhibition to show it along with several of his other works. He wrote a detailed catalogue explaining the significance of the picture.

The painting was commissioned by Thomas Plint, a well-known collector of Pre-Raphaelite art, who died before its completion.[1] A second version, smaller at 684 × 990 mm, was commissioned in 1859 and completed in 1863. This is now in the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery. It is closely similar, though for the lady with a blue parasol the face of Maria Leathart, the commissioner’s wife, replaces that of Mrs Brown in the Manchester version.[2]

The picture depicts a group of so-called “navvies” digging up the road to build an underground tunnel. It is typically assumed that this was part of the extensions of London’s sewerage system, which were being undertaken to deal with the threat of typhus and cholera. The workers are in the centre of the painting. On either side of them are individuals who are either unemployed or represent the leisured classes. Behind the workers are two wealthy figures on horseback, whose progress along the road has been halted by the excavations.[3]

The painting also portrays an election campaign, evidenced by posters and people carrying sandwich boards with the name of the candidate “Bobus”. A poster also draws attention to the potential presence of a burglar.[4]

The setting is an accurate depiction of The Mount on Heath Street in Hampstead, London, where a side road rises up above the main road and runs alongside it. Brown made a detailed study of the location in 1852.”

Following are photos of our group painting this BIG PICTURE.

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Painting a glass bottle 7th December

In this very interesting demonstration, Caroline started with a pale green wash, onto which she loosely sketched the shape of the straight sided bottle. Then she put in a white background around the shape.

Using a flat brush she painted in the four corners and the base of the bottle, then the round neck. A lighter tone of the green base colour filled in the body.

Caroline said that the complex and numerous shapes and reflections could not all be recorded, so we should select some shapes that appealed. A green bag and red bauble that were behind the bottle were incorporated.

Keep the highlights until last and use a rigger and white paint. When painting round bottles, make sure the ellipses match. Caroline finished with some shadows thrown around the base of the bottle.

bottle-1 bottle-2

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