NEWS

Dupont is Waiting for Approval to Open Again

We have had to close again for the past few weeks due to the recent lockdown. During the last opening we had up to 15 people enjoying art again at DuPont with distance. We hope to see you again soon. While you wait, check out our you tube page for recent videos from our talented instructors.
At present we are waiting to see when Ventnor Hall will be open for us and will let you know as soon as that happens.

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Dupont Video Workshops

Our two excellent instructors, Lucy Parker and Caroline Marsland are continuing to educate us through Dupont’s You Tube workshops until the end of October! This is an excellent way to keep your painting skills up.

Please click on the link below and start painting.

Dupont Video Workshops 

If you have any comments or would like advice, please contact the tutor

Lucy Parker lucy@lbparker.com

Caroline Marsland caroline.marsland@gmail.com

 

 

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DUPONT ART CLUB EXHIBITION WINNERS

The Winner of the Dupont Art Club’s 2020 on line Art Exhibition is Natasha Owen for her mixed media painting Foamy

Runner up was Victor Perkins for his Acrylic painting Beckets Mate

Second Runner up was Wendy Webb for her pastel painting Teddy

Congratulations to each of them and thank you to the hundreds of viewers who cast votes for their favourite painting in this years Annual Dupont Art Exhibition.

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Dupont Art Club Exhibition Results

Thank you to the hundreds of viewers who cast votes for their favourite painting in this year’s Annual Art Exhibition which took place on line. We are proud to announce the winner and runners up.

Winner: Natasha Owen for Foamy, with her mixed media. painting. Natasha wins a bottle of champagne and the Dupont cup for a year.

The Runner Up is Victor Perkins for Beckets’s Mate, with his acrylic painting. Victor wins a bottle of wine and a certificate

 

The second Runner-up is Wendy Webb for Teddy, with her pastel painting. Wendy wins a bottle of wine and a certificate.

Congratulations to all prize winners. The competition and exhibition have been a resounding success. We thank everyone who took part, entering their work or voting.

All the pictures will now be transferred to the Gallery Page of the website. Anyone who would like to purchase a piece of art can send an email to dupontartclub@gmail.com with their contact details and they will be put in contact with the artist.

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DUPONT VIDEO WORKSHOPS

 

DUPONT VIDEO WORKSHOPS

As sessions at Dupont have been suspended we have asked our two Tutors to design and produce video art lessons.

We have established a Dupont YouTube page so we can post the videos where they can easily be seen.

You can watch them right through or just look at part each day.

Each video has a title so you can select the video you want to watch.

New videos will be put on our YouTube page over the next few weeks.

So please keep checking

Please click on the link below and start painting.

Dupont Video Workshops

 

If you have any comments or would like advice please contact the Tutor

Lucy Parker lucy@lbparker.com

Caroline Marsland  caroline.marsland@gmail.com

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Charcoal drawing by Caroline Marsden 11/03/20

Charcoal as a medium lends itself particularly well to moody urban landscapes.

Caroline decided to draw this snowy street scene

Using Windsor and Newton charcoal, which is a good quality with velvety texture, Caroline began by blocking in the shapes of the buildings. She then lightly rubbed over the charcoal to smooth it.

She applied the charcoal  across the road and then used a rubber to erase the tyre marks and show the snow.

She went over the buildings to outline the edges and put in marks for the windows and the arches. It is important to keep your marks consistent as this will make the drawing harmonious.

She determined that the vanishing point was at the meeting of the two sides of the road in the far distance. She then drew light diagonal lines out  from the vanishing point to the edges of the paper to get the perspective right.

The focal point of the drawing is the lamppost as it is the area of greatest contrast as it stands out against the bright sky.

Caroline went on to use a thinner piece of charcoal for the details. She put in the snow on the bicycle , and on the signs by using the rubber. Remember it’s easy to rub out and redraw any areas you’re unhappy with until you get the desired result.

 

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Still Life by Caroline Marsden

Start out by choosing your main object, then you can add interest by selecting additional objects which compliment this. It’s probably best to have a theme, which can be anything  – the possibilities are endless.

You should use an odd number of objects as this is more appealing than an even number. Make sure you have variety in size and shape as well as colour. When arranging the objects try to ensure that you use the shapes to lead the eye into and around the image.

A square format works well for still life, but depending on your subjects you can also use portrait or landscape.

Good lighting is essential and it may help to position an Anglepoise lamp to get good shadows which create tonal value.

This is the still life Caroline prepared

She started by lightly drawing the main object  in outline which was the large bottle, which she positioned slightly right of centre. Next she drew the small bottle outline, noting its size and shape relative to the first object. Continuing, she added the onion the orange and the bottle top, carefully checking where objects overlapped. The scissors were then drawn in very carefully, as the long point of the blade is used to lead the eye . When trying to place an object at an angle like this, it may help to hold your pencil horizontally  up towards the object and tilt it to the required angle. Then place the pencil at this angle on the paper. Don’t use an eraser if you are unhappy with the positioning, just redraw in the correct position next to it. The danger of using an eraser is that it is easy to redraw the same mistake once you’ve removed the original.

Once all your outlines are in you can go back and enter the details . Finally you put in the shadows. These are very important to add tonal value . The dark line on the scissors leads the eye up to the dark top of the onion and from there up to the hanging leaf. This will create harmony.

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Painting or drawing upside down by Caroline Marsden

It is a good idea to try this as an exercise to change the way that you look at things. By working upside down you draw only the shapes you can see and not what you think should be there.

Caroline started by using this photograph pinned upside down

You can, if you prefer, simplify things by splitting the photograph into four  to help you in positioning.

Using a 7B pencil she first drew an ellipse ( representing the tabletop ). Using this shape to work from, she went on to put in the oblong shape underneath and the black square to the left of that. From there she entered the curves which take the eye down from both the square and the oblong to the bottom. She continued in this way, plotting in the main larger shapes.

After all the main shapes were done she moved on to the more intricate parts. This is done by paying close attention to where things are positioned relative to the other main shapes already done. This really will hone your observational skills.

Finally think about adding tonal value. Caroline used  an 8B pencil to shade in the darkest areas first then the lighter areas using a variety of hatching and crosshatching.

Only when she had finished did she turn the drawing the right way up.

this was a very good representation of the original photograph

 

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Brush strokes demo by Caroline Marsden

FLAT BRUSHES

These can be used for a myriad of different effects. They are especially useful for painting buildings or any other subject which has straight edges, and are economical with the paint as often only one stroke is needed.

A BRIGHT is a shorter and stiffer version of a FLAT which will give you bolder strokes.

A flat brush is great for getting perspective and you can gently tap it to get a nice thin line as shown in the guttering and windowsills above.

Don’t throw away your old ones as these can be used effectively for texture , fur or feathers.

A FILBERT

is a flat brush with curved sides, great for giving a softer edge such as in clouds or petals. Caroline holds the brush at an angle to the paper and tries to  touch the paper with only the paint, not pressing down too hard on the brush.

A FAN BRUSH

is a specialist brush for doing texture, fur and feathers. Bob Ross can be seen on YouTube  demonstrating painting fir trees using this brush.

A ROUND

is the one of choice for Monet and is useful for  short expressive strokes. If you use a large one it can hold a lot of paint and be a good choice.

 

A FAT HOG

is an enormous brush which holds a huge amount of paint and is very good for stencilling

A RIGGER

gets its name as it was first used for putting in the slender rigging of boats. This is best used with really thinned-down paint making sure the brush is well loaded and with a good point. You an also use this for hair and fur but it’s best to use it for the finishing touches as it would be quite time consuming to draw in every single bit of hair. It’s great for cats’ whiskers.

WATERCOLOUR BRUSHES

are best kept separate from your other brushes as you’ll ruin them if you get acrylic or oil on them.

It is worth investing in a good large brush with a good point as this will last a long time and be very flexible. You can draw using the point and even do washes with it.

Washes over large areas are usually done with a flat brush or a hake.

Caroline likes to use Pro Art brushes but is also happy with Graduate. You don’t need to buy sable or other real hair brushes as synthetic brushes are just as good to work with.

 

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