NEWS

Watercolour Painting of Patterned Fabric

Caroline Marsland took the Wednesday Dupont class through how to watercolour paint a patterned fabric on paper. We were not painting the fabric. 

She started off by lightly drawing the general shape of the fabric lightly with pencil. She then painted in the the colour of the fabric first with all of the shadows that are in it. She layered the shadows for best effect and used tissue paper over the wet parts to show texture at times She worked away from the centre with a wet in wet technique. For the really white areas, she suggested using masking fluid. You need to exaggerate the shadows because when you put the pattern in, they will disappear somewhat. 

Once the background is dry, she said to very lightly draw in the pattern first with complex patterns  but with a simple pattern, she just paints the patters in.

Some suggestions: Remember to sqint, She painted from light to dark to light as needed. 

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Dupont Christmas Party

December 13th was the date for a joyful Christmas party with over 50 past and present members of Dupont in attendance. Many went home with purchases from our bring and buy table and we all were given a chance to vote on the  painting card which was handed in by Dupont members. As can be seen below, there were a number of impressive paintings displayed. The final favourite voted on by members was by Sandra Emery with her two field mice, who went home with a bottle of bubbly for her submission. The party ended with a huge raffle draw which is always a favourite. As can be seen in the photos, great fun was had by all. 

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Painting with Charcoal and Watercolour

On November 14th instructor Caroline Marsland did a demo on painting using charcoal and watercolour. This was done on 140 pound watercolour paper. This medium is good for moody pictures. There is usually a tinge of charcoal in the watercolour leaving a shaded picture. She used a piece of charcoal but using a charcoal pencil is fine.

Caroline started off with a drawing of the shadows in dark charcoal. She used a loose dribble runny wash for the sky. In order for this not to run into the foreground, she turned the painting upside down to prevent this while painting. Once it is dry, she overpainted it to give it a darker, more dramatic look. The foreground was painted with watercolour which blended into the black charcoal shadows.

The overall effect was a quick moody picture of moody stones.

 

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Painting leaves in watercolour and in acrylic by Caroline Marsden

When working in watercolour you should always work light to dark.

Caroline started by lightly sketching the outlines of the leaves in pencil and then she used masking fluid to map out the main veins. Then it was left to dry.

Using a round brush with a point she started by putting a wash of yellow with a little red over the entire leaf. While it was still wet, she dropped in a red mixture around the edges of the leaf, letting it do its own thing. Next she put in the green, using a bright green mix (cooled down with a little bit of the yellow wash). Using a clean brush she pulled out some veins from the still masked area. Next, she put in the leaf tips using a dark brown and a rigger.  If at this stage you can see that your colours are not strong enough this is easily rectified by first adding water, then dropping in more of the desired colour. When you’re happy with the painting rub out the masking fluid with your fingers. Then paint in the veins using a pale yellow and  finishing with a dark reddish brown.

Below is the leaf still with the masking fluid.

 

If you don’t want to use masking fluid you can carefully paint around the main veins leaving them as white paper, as with the small leaf below. You can then simply go in with a bright red paint for the vein and a darker colour underneath for depth.

The picture shows the final paintings using both methods

 

When using acrylic you should work from dark to light.

Caroline started the painting by outlining the leaves using Hooker’s green. She mixed three shades of green; dark, medium  and light. She first painted on the dark green where the veins were, then blocked in the leaf using the medium colour and finally used the light colour for all the highlights. She let this dry. She mixed up some quite runny yellow paint and used a rigger to drag the yellow vein over the top of the darker green . She finished it off by putting a dark green colour over the bottom of the yellow vein for depth.

For the berries she started by painting them white. Next, she mixed three shades of red and started with the dark red to put in the darker areas, then filled in the berry with the medium shade and lastly the highlights in the light shade.  By painting the berries white first it is easier to get a really vibrant red.

 

 

Report and photos by Lesley McBride

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Painting a still life in acrylic by Caroline Marsden

When tackling a complex  subject like a vase of flowers, it’s a good idea to draw the outline of the entire thing using a dark colour.

Start the outline by placing your main flowers ( the ones that are wholly visible ) first  and then moving on to the partially visible ones, moving round and outwards till you have captured everything.

Now you can move on to painting the flowers. Start by painting the background, then the rearmost  flowers, so that you can paint the main subject of the wholly visible flowers on top of the background ones.

Caroline advised buying a high quality yellow paint as it often is very difficult to get a good mix using the cheaper ones with less pigment. She mixed three shades of yellow using lemon yellow, yellow ochre and white. Adding the white makes the colour more opaque and also stops it becoming too acid. You can also add a tiny bit of red , but be careful not to add too much.

Using a pointed round brush you can make a nice petal shape. Start by putting in the darker areas and then paint on your petals on top. Concentrate on darks and lights to bring out the shapes of the petals. Next,use a smaller brush to add lots of bright tips to represent the tops of the petals, also using this brush to put in more darker shades to further define your petals.

For the red flower, first put in the centre in a bright phthalo green. Then, using a rigger, go over with small dots of yellow, finishing off with the rigger to put in a dark shadow under the dots. Paint on the red petals and then add white on top where you see the lighter colour.

Then paint on your darker red and finally, once it’s dry, paint over with the first red, and the white areas will now pop! For the leaves and stems use phthalo green with red to get a dark green.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Rest areas in paintings

Caroline used the Pre-Raphaelites to demonstrate very good use of rest areas in paintings.

Rest areas are essential to allow the viewer to easily move their eyes around the space. Use of colour is also effective in leading the viewer around the painting. Cool colours will recede and as such will be a good choice for rest areas. You should save your more intense colours for the most important parts of the painting. You may also opt for duller colours or very similar colours for the rest areas with little contrast, keeping your lighter and brighter colours for the main focus.

In Sir Joseph Noel Paton’s  Bluidie Tryst the pale sky offers a relief, and silhouettes the main character. The right hand side of the painting is very dull so as not to distract from the main action.

In William Maw Egley’s The Talking Oak he uses tonal restful colours for the background. Notice that the blue sky echoes the colour of the girl’s dress, which will lead the eye to it.

 

In Sir John Everett Millais’ Isabella he sets the busy scene against a fairly bland wall and a very pale blue sky.

It is a good idea to do thumbnail sketches to ensure you get the correct balance of rest areas.

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Check out EOS Exhibition on Screen

S E A S O N   S I X
FIND A SCREENING

EXHIBITION ON SCREEN, the pioneering series of gallery and artists films for the cinema, returns for a sixth season, featuring three brand new feature films and encore screenings of audience favourite Rembrandt, back by popular demand.

The new films in Season Six will reveal the story behind Degas‘ obsessive pursuit for perfection; how Picasso’s lesser-known early years shaped his rise to international fame; and the profound influence of Japan on the work of Van Gogh. Meanwhile, Rembrandt will return to screens marking the 350th anniversary of the artist’s death.

  Continue below for dates and synopsises!  
DEGAS: PASSION FOR PERFECTION
Directed by David Bickerstaff
Release date: from 6 November 2018

EXHIBITION ON SCREEN journeys from the streets of Paris to the heart of a superb exhibition at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, whose extensive collection of Degas’ works is the most representative in Britain. With exclusive access to view rare and diverse works, this film tells a fascinating story of Degas’ pursuit for perfection through both experimentation with new techniques and lessons learnt from studying the past masters. (read more)
YOUNG PICASSO
Directed by Phil Grabsky
Release date: from 5 February 2019

Pablo Picasso is one of the greatest artists of all time – and right up until his death in 1973 he was the most prolific of artists. Many films have dealt with these later years – the art, the affairs and the wide circle of friends. But where did this all begin? What made Picasso in the first place? Too long ignored, it is time to look at the early years of Picasso; the upbringing and the learning that led to his extraordinary achievements. (read more)
REMBRANDT
From the National Gallery, London and Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam
Directed by Kat Mansoor
Release date: from 9 April 2019

Every Rembrandt exhibition is eagerly anticipated but this major show hosted by London’s National Gallery and Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum was an event like no other. Given privileged access to both galleries the film documents this landmark exhibition, whilst interweaving Rembrandt’s life story, with behind-the-scenes preparations at these world-famous institutions. (read more)
VAN GOGH & JAPAN
Directed by David Bickerstaff
Release date: from 4 June 2019

“I envy the Japanese” Van Gogh wrote to his brother Theo. In the exhibition on which this film is based – VAN GOGH & JAPAN at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam – one can see why. Though Vincent van Gogh never visited Japan it is the country that had the most profound influence on him and his art. One cannot understand Van Gogh without understanding how Japanese art arrived in Paris in the middle of the 19th century and the profound impact it had on artists like Monet, Degas and, above all, Van Gogh. (read more)
Want to see the previous seasons again?
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