NEWS

A winter scene in watercolour using only Sienna and Ultra Marine 11/12/19

Caroline chose the two colours of sienna and ultramarine blue as they can be mixed in many different ways to give you both cool and warm colours.

The group selected this photo for Caroline to use as her inspiration.

 

When starting a watercolour it is best to work from light to dark. Looking  at the picture, first determine where your lightest areas are.

Caroline was using White Knight watercolours and a large round  brush with a good point to it. She began using a dilute sienna for the sky and the reflection, and let this dry. She then mixed two shades of grey using both colours . She began to put in the tree line using the lighter colour. She used the brush in small  upward strokes moving along the tree line. Then she drew up the water in a horizontal stroke to avoid a harsh line. She went on to add a darker line underneath for more tonal contrast. You may need to revisit the darker area as it will dry lighter.

Once happy with the top part she went on to do the reflections carefully putting them in the correct position .Using a dry brush she put in some texture.

She put in the darker trees using a rigger for the trunks and finally the darkest trees .

She decided that the little island in the foreground would be the focal point, so she painted this in a warm tone using only sienna at first. She added some more sienna to the parts of the painting for cohesion.

She put in the ray of light by swiping a tissue in a diagonal line which was very effective.

Finally she put in a ghost wash to of ultra marine to add mood to the background.

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DUPONT CHRISTMAS PARTY

Only a few days left until  Thursday, December 12th. We almost have a sell out of our tickets for this very popular party. Members are asked to bring unwanted art materials, books, bags, etc. for the ever popular bring and buy table.

Just a reminder that our first session on the new year will begin on Wednesday, January 8th.

Seasons Greetings from your executive. May you have a healthy, happy and artful Christmas and New Year.

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Painting a Christmas Card 27/11/19

Caroline suggested that to get inspiration for your card it is a good idea to have a look at cards from earlier years. Christmas cards have evolved in their design from the Victorian age to the present day.

We looked at several different cards from the Art Deco to the war years , here are a few examples:-

Caroline decided on a stylised angel for today’s demo.

She started by drawing out the shape to fill the card using the angel wings to stretch up into the corners.

She then chose a focal point which in this case would be a light being carried by the angel. Next she angled the lines of the wings so that they drew the eye to the focal point. You can find many different styles of angel on the internet on which to base your own creation.

Once happy with your outline you must choose your colours so that the angel comes forward in the painting.

Caroline started with a turquoise wash on the angel’s robe and then used a cobalt blue for the background. She mixed a warm red to add interest to the robe. The light is then added using a bright yellow and this colour is also added to the angel’s halo and as reflected light on her wings.

This was just a quick sketch from which she would go on to produce the finished card.

If you would prefer to make a humorous card , again there are many examples on the internet. Last year Caroline made a card for her friend who had a cat called Jack.  She drew Jack as a Christmas tree with his little paws holding candles and a fish shaped Christmas present under the tree.

 

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Importance of negative spaces by Keith Manning Kennedy

Keith started by mapping out the outlines of fuchsias  in a vase using a 4H pencil. To create more interest in shapes and colour he added in two butterflies. He then carefully painted in the background by filling in the negative spaces between the flowers and leaves. Remember that the shapes created  by the negative spaces are themselves a very important element in your mosaic of colour.

As he was painting a brightly coloured piece, he made sure to keep the background a subtle complementary colour. In this case, a pale blue to bring out the magenta in the flower. Old Holland permanent rose and permanent magenta were used for the fuchsia. Always use a freshly  mixed paint and don’t be tempted to use some old ready mixed paint  from your palette which may have become tainted. He used a green gold colour for the leaves. Using a filbert you can get a nice fine line when needed and also get enough paint on the brush to fill in the spaces; a sable brush is well worth the money.

For the more intricate little areas he used a small flat brush and if needed turned the painting upside down to let the water move around within the correct area. If you do get a small puddle forming, dry off your brush and use the brush to soak up the excess.

In watercolour the general rule is that you can apply up to three layers of colour after which the colour goes dead. If this happens you can always get yourself out of trouble by going over it with a lighter shade of pastel or pastel pencil as used in this example.

Failing this you can paint over with a thick  layer of white gouache then wait for this to dry fully before going over with a quick sweep of another colour.

When painting the butterfly’s wing Keith used a graphite pencil to put in the delicate edge and then blended this into the colour.

 

Here are another two examples of Keith’s use of negative space:

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USING OIL PASTELS 16/10/19

Caroline introduced a session on oil pastels by saying that it is wise to use the best quality pastels. The ones she had were Sennelier (£3.50 a stick, or can be bought in boxes). For paper, a rough surface is needed and she was using a brown paper scrapbook (Seawhites).Caroline had a photo portrait of a long haired Roma male as her model for today’s demonstration.

Beginning with a dark brown outline, Caroline sketched his features with the edge of the pastel. She blocked shadows with dark brown, followed by red and green reflected on one side of the face by the grassy background. The green was toned down by use of yellow ochre on top. Various colours were applied and built up either by layers of pastel or by blending with fingers. A useful tool was a paper pencil-shaped blender, which could be dipped onto the pastel to pick out small delicate areas. This method was useful for sections of the eye, such as upper and lower lids, and for the light reflected in the iris.

 

 

 

 

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PAINTING ROTHKO AND COLOUR THEORY 2/10/2019

Mark Rothko. B 1903 D. 1970

Markus Rothkovitz was a Latvian of Jewish descent. His family emigrated from persecution and settled in Oregon in 1913, where he started painting. In 1920 he moved to the New York Art School where he became anti-establishment and was influenced by Klee, Cezanne and Picasso.
Rothko taught children for 20 years. He liked the simplicity of children’s art. In the 1950s his art became completely abstract, using blocks of colour and influenced by the Fauvists. In the 1960s he used blocks of intense colour, following which he suffered from depression, reflected in his use of darker colours with less luminosity.

Demonstration
Caroline chose a thick first coat of yellow, then mixed Phalo green and purple as a compliment to the colour wheel.

Then mixed an intense orange and placed it into the yellow square.

There then followed a succession of different choices of colour to illustrate the effect of one colour on another.

 

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Ode to Autumn Watercolour Workshop

Artistic Ode to Autumn – Watercolour Workshop  

Thursday 7th November 2019

This workshop will focus on using watercolour in traditional and contemporary ways, to paint still life with an autumnal flavour.

We will be looking at techniques to paint leaves, twigs, conkers, pumpkins, squashes, berries and all things autumnal.

Also included will be tips on background choices and colour mixing.

There will be six separate still life displays to choose from, but you are welcome to bring your own items if you wish.

Session 1: 10 am – 12 .30

This session will work in traditional painting techniques including layering.

Session 2:   1.30 – 4 pm

This session will be working on loose painting techniques.

Paper will be available to buy from the club stock, but you may bring your own.

Please register on the booking sheet on the notice board at Ventnor.

Fee: £10 per session

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Painting in the style of Vincent Van Gogh

Van Gogh was born in 1853, and had a tormented life with a lot of anxiety. It is possible that he may have been a manic depressive. He only started painting aged 27 and tragically died aged only 37.  However during those 10 years he produced roughly 2,100 pieces of work. His early work was very dark and his younger brother who ran an art gallery in Paris advised him to  change to a brighter palette. He therefore evolved from the Potato Eaters to  his much better known works like the Cafe at Arles or his famous Sunflowers. His favourite colour was yellow followed closely by cobalt blue, which together make for a striking painting. He had a unique style of painting which was driven by emotion.

He used various brush techniques including contour painting and pointillism. His famous Irises were painted much more flatly using the silhouette method of outlining the subject first.

Caroline started her painting of sunflowers by a background of a pale blue colour onto which she painted the outline of the sunflower in a light brown.

Then she mixed up 3 shades of brown and using small expressive strokes she quickly filled in the centre of the flower. Next, she went over this with a darker shade of brown for depth. Van Gogh would have done layer after layer using very thick oil paint straight from the tube. After this, she filled in the petals with a dark yellow colour using swift expressive strokes.

Using a filbert she went over the background with a strong blue and then mixes of white and blue and green and blue making sweeping strokes to create movement.

Then she went in with a paler yellow on top of the petals , leaving some of the original colour showing through. She used wiggly lines to add movement and liveliness to the painting. Lastly she put in the leaves using viridian green and white. She mixed  very dark brown using cobalt blue red and green for the very darkest areas in the centre of the flower.  This is the finished work.

 

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Tonal values in portraiture by Caroline Marsden – 4th Sept 2019

To get a good 3D image you need to use strong shadows to bring out the features. A focal point of a drawing or painting is always where the greatest contrast in tonal values is placed, i.e. the darkest dark and the lightest light of the range you are using. You don’t need to use pure white and pure black but should limit your range to somewhere in between these extremes.

 

This lady was chosen by the group as the most interesting to do.

Caroline started with a 4B pencil to do the rough outline very lightly. She always starts by drawing the nose and then works outwards from the nose carefully noting the position  of the other features . She next drew in the lips measuring (either by eye or using a ruler if needed) the space between the nose and the lips. Next she drew in the glasses and finally onto the face shape. She noted that the space between the chin and the nose was equal to the space between the top of the glasses and the top of the forehead. The last thing she did was draw in the eyes . She used hatching to create light areas of shadow.

This first stage done she moved on to put in much deeper shadows using a 7B pencil. This pencil is very effective for defining the darker areas. The only problem is that the softer the pencil the more likely it is to go blunt quickly and it will require regular sharpening as you sketch.

By squinting at the photo she could easily see where the darker lines and shadows were and she uses a really dark background to push the face forward. The greatest contrast in tonal values is seen in the eyes

 

 

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Dupont Exhibition a Success!

Our annual Dupont Art Exhibition was a great success this year. We had 477 people visit with over £1100.00 sold in pictures and over £500 in cards and gifts. This was above previous years totals.

Peoples choice award was awarded to Terri Micklam with her painting ‘Mrs. Cluckworth is watching you”. The runner-up was Diana Fabris with her painting of Dame Judy Dench.

Dupont starts their fall schedule off on Wednesday, September 4th and Thursday Sept 5th. There was much interest in joining the club shown at our exhibition so we hope to see many of you there.

 

 

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